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Philosophy in a Time of Crisis will send out a newsletter every month, providing direct links to our newly published articles, interviews and events and a shortlist of the most important and timely philosophical contributions currently circulating on the net.

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Contributions

 

Philosophy in the Time of Crisis does not intend to be either a classic academic journal, nor a traditional academic publication.

We strongly support the circulation of extremely brief, punctual and extemporaneous reflections, noctural wonderings and ponderous notes. In other words, we would like to create a space for those minimal, minor writings that remain at the margins of philosophical forums and beyond the frontiers of academic publishing: a philosophy of the margins and for the margins.

 

We are currently looking forward to accept short articles and contribution on ‘Crisis and Critique’ – as well as on the key themes that will be at the centre of our collective investigation in the next thre months.: ‘Precarity’ (March), ‘Security’ (April) and ‘Margins’ (May). More detailed instructions and guidelines for contributions are available below.

 

Crisis and Critique - Call for Contributions

 

We live in critical times. From the spread of terrorist and counter-terrorist networks to the prospect of ecological collapse, from the growth of social inequalities to the delegitimation of traditional political institutions, from recurring spectres of financial collapse to the reality of widespread economic destabilization, discourses on ‘crisis’ have become ubiquitous. Obviously, the concept of ‘crisis’ has a long and controversial history, which may be traced back to the Greek conception of κρίσις, meaning both the high point of a dispute and the resulting decision or judgment (often in a legal context). And yet, today the concept of 'crisis' has assumed an unprecedented significance and, in the words of French philosopher Myriam Revault D’Allones, has rapidly emerged as the ‘absolute metaphor of the contemporary age.’

 

And yet, is crisis really the emblematic concept of our late modernity? What have been the various manifestations as well as conceptual deployments of crisis over time, and what do they reveal about the specificities of our contemporary age? What political mechanisms are activated by the use of 'crisis' as a discourse and conceptual framework?  As well as the beginning of the work of critique, is crisis not also a key instrument of populism, and a very useful tool in the politics of fear? Do we not have reasons to be suspicious, if not fearful, of the rhetoric of crisis itself, and, following the example of sociologists as diverse as Ulrich Beck, Jean Baudrillard or Niklas Luhman, reject the vocabulary of crisis (and critique) as obsolete and possibly even complacent? Is the narrative of crisis in crisis itself? What does this imply for our self-understanding and our ability to make sense of the world? Should philosophy contribute to a radical critique of crisis itself? Or, at the very least, how can philosophy contribute to a better understanding of the conceptions and circumstances of crisis?

To tackle those questions, we invite submissions on the philosophy and lived reality of “crisis” from thinkers and writers from a wide range of disciplines, including philosophy, political theory intellectual history, the history of science, art and music, literature, and cultural studies.

As Philosophy in the Time of Crisis does not intend to be either a classic journal nor a traditional academic publication, we strongly support the circulation of extremely brief, punctual notes, extemporaneous reflections, nocturnal wonderings, daily musings and ponderous considerations. In short, we would like to create a space for those minimal, minor writings that remain at the margins of philosophical forums and beyond the frontiers of academic publishing. Short pieces between 500 and 1500 words are preferable, but we are open to experimenting with other formats.


In order to submit a short contribution, and for any question, please feel free to write us directly at: philosophyincrisis@gmail.com and/or https://www.philosophyx.co.uk/contact-us